Angie Chang

Angie Chang

Angie Chang co-founded Women 2.0 in 2006 with Shaherose Charania. She currently serves as Editor-In-Chief of Women 2.0 and is working to mainstream women in entrepreneurship. Previously, Angie held roles in product management, web UI design, and entrepreneurship. In 2008, Angie launched Bay Area Girl Geek Dinners, asking that guys come as the “+1″ for once. Angie holds a B.A. in English and Social Welfare from UC Berkeley.

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During the week of July 30, Angie Chang, co-founder of Women 2.0 will be sharing her experience working to mainstream women in entrepreneurship. Join the conversation!

Angie Chang co-founded Women 2.0 in 2006 with Shaherose Charania. She currently serves as Editor-In-Chief of Women 2.0 and is working to mainstream women in entrepreneurship. Previously, Angie held roles in product management, web UI design, and entrepreneurship. In 2008, Angie launched Bay Area Girl Geek Dinners, asking that guys come as the “+1″ for once. Angie holds a B.A. in English and Social Welfare from UC Berkeley. Follow her on Twitter at @thisgirlangie and Women 2.0 at@women2.

  1. 812 days ago

    Dani Matielo

    Hello, Angie, thank you so much for joining us in this space. My question is about challenges faced by girls and women specifically in the entrepreneurship world: we know women are underrepresented in all layers of the technology pyramid. But when they manage to find their way and really become part of the game, as CEOs, for example, is it harder for them to get funding and support? And, if so, what is the reason for that? What kind of initiative could help us tackle this challenge? Thank you!



    • Angie Chang

      High-growth high-tech entrepreneurship in general is extremely rocky and risky. With women representing less than 12% of computer science majors out of colleges and universities, this puts women at a disadvantage in the technology industry. Women shouldn’t have a problem finding mentors but where women fail to succeed is in finding sponsors in positions of power to nominate them for board seats, executive roles and seats at the highest decision-making levels. My advice for women seeking funding to look for venture funds and venture capitalists (VCs) that have a history of funding women-led ventures. Look at VCs including Aileen Lee, Theresia Gouw Ranzetta, Ann Miura-Ko. Look at angel investors like Joanne Wilson, Marissa Mayer, Esther Dyson. Apply to pitch at Golden Seeds, Women 2.0, Pipeline Fund. Look into accelerator programs like Astia, Springboard Enterprises, 500 Startups. Google all these names – know your funding ecosystem! Women-led early-stage ventures seeking funding should definitely apply to Women 2.0′s own PITCH NYC Startup Competition by August 31, 2012 – Details here: http://bit.ly/PITCH-NYC-2012

      810 days ago


    • Angie Chang

      Women have an enormous opportunity in technology recently, and the ecosystem is definitely supportive of women-led ventures both in New York and in San Francisco. There are plenty of meetups and groups for like-minded individuals, from newbie programmers in Python and Ruby on Rails, to entrepreneurship meetups and panel discussions to meet industry veterans. Sign up for the Startup Digest in your city and Women 2.0′s newsletter (http://bit.ly/w2_news) and start getting out there! Learn, network, iterate, ship. Also, Women 2.0 hosts Founder Friday events the first Friday of every month in over a dozen cities around the world – not only NY, SF, LA and the usual US cities but in Spanish and Latin American countries as well. See here: http://bit.ly/FFw2Global

      810 days ago


    • Chika Uwazie

      Hello Angie. Thank you for all of the wonderful ingisht that you shared about funding. I am a big fan of Women 2.0 and love how it is creating an ecosystem for women all over the world. My direction is directed toward African women in startups. As someone in the US that wants to launch a socila impact start up in Africa I have found it very hard to get funding. Most people I speak to always say that is a great idea but either we currently do not fund in Africa or they do not know enough about the market to want to fund. Do you know any funds based in the US that have previous experience in funding women entrepreneurs in Africa? Also how can the image change so people see that Africa has vast amount of potential for vital women led startups.

      810 days ago


    • Angie Chang

      Good question Chika, I would pose this question to the Women 2.0 community as a whole by inviting you to submit a guest blog post to Women 2.0 about your social impact startup in Africa and asking about funding opportunities for such projects – maybe someone will know and leave a comment to your post or answer on social media channels where we distribute posts? This is my best answer for you – we crowdsource our smart community whenever we can. Let me know – you can email editor@women2.com

      809 days ago